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Since the Lancaster Insurance Classic Motor Show show is so huge, Dave Leadbetter and I thought we’d pool our photographs to try to give you a more general overview of the sheer size and variety of the exhibits around the NEC’s vast halls.

With so much to choose from, it’s hard to pick favourites, but for me, the 1973 De Tomaso Pantera L in a fabulous shade of green, the sublime 1967 silver and black Buick Riviera on the Classic American stand – one of the most elegant cars of the 1960’s to come out of the US in my humble opinion – and the absolutely stunning white 1972 Maserati Ghibli Spyder on Borrani wires were the stand-outs for me.

Dave also got excited about some of the rare cars on display, though being typically contrary he picked out the AC Invacar and Innocenti Regent 1300 for a special mention. However, the Toyota Corolla AE86, Ford Fiesta Supersport and Sunbeam Lotus are less controversial choices. He couldn’t pass without giving a nod to the 1989 Peugeot 505 GTi Estate though, one of only 3 right hand drive examples of a Dangel 4×4 conversion.  You don’t see one of those everyday.

Beyond our own particular highlights, readers will hopefully find much to enjoy in the photo gallery below!

6 Responses

  1. yrhmblhst

    SO much good stuff there! From the white Manta, The Alpine, the Lotusses…Loti, whatever-including the Sunbeam Talbots – the Escorts and Fiesta, the Aceca, Maserati, Yellow Cuda, similar hued midyear Corvette, Alfas, F40, absolutely killer looking Renault 17, signs, memorabilia…just a metric tonne of cool stuff.
    However…and Im afriad y’all are gonna disown me…but…that dangel Peugeot REALLY flips my switch. Shame about the colour, but man those things are cool…

    Reply
  2. Tony Wawryk

    I have to say that the yellow Renault 17 – which has had a turbo added to it – does indeed look terrific, one of the show’s pleasant surprises for me.

    Reply
  3. Zack Stiling

    Well, that Veteran Mors is what I need in my life. The elegance of the tourer body, the comfort of button-backed leather and the aloof pride of all that brasswork – just what I need for playing Mr. Toad.

    Good to see a shot there of the amazing tri-tone 1955 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer which won Classic American’s Car of the Year Award. It was a Chicago car when new and I believe the rock ‘n’ roll paint job is totally standard. The buyer didn’t specify a single optional extra save for the Kelsey-Hayes wire wheels.

    Good to see the Morgan factory has let its replica of the first ever production Morgan out for the weekend. The 1910 8hp Runabout was where it all began for the Malvern marque.

    Now the car that’s really piqued my interest is that Vauxhall Cresta estate. The factory never made PA estates but a small number were converted by Friary of Basingstoke. However, that ain’t one of them, so is it just an amateur conversion or something more interesting?

    Reply
  4. Dave Leadbetter

    The two door PA Cresta estate is quite a thing and I concur that it’s definitely not a Friary conversion. I did consider it might be a coachbuilt hearse repurposed into a (live) passenger car but I’d expect it to be a touch longer if that was the case. It’s a bit of a mystery and I really want to know now… That’s half the problem of going to the NEC; with 3,000 cars to get round you could be there for the whole three days very easily if you got talking to everyone!

    Reply
  5. Anders Bilidt

    Ouuuuuh… so much to drool over. I’m gutted that I missed out on the NEC this year. It’s always a treat walking through the many halls…

    Needless to say (and yes, I am of course hugely biased…) I’m thrilled to see that little Rochdale Olympic! In the opposite spectrum of GT’s, three of my favourites are beautifully represented with the green metallic Gordon Keeble, the pale blue AC Aceca and the light blue metallic Maserati Mistral. It’s a real event seeing just one of them – let alone all three! And just how cool is that Dangel Peugeot 505 Estate?

    Reply

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